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Application of SE concepts for Complex System Reliability

Thu, 08/08/2013 - 20:55 -- jcook

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Faculty Advisor(s): 
Jason L. Cook, Ph.D.
Faculty Email(s): 
jcook@stevens.edu
Program: 
Systems Engineering
Project Title: 
Application of SE concepts for Complex System Reliability
Description: 

Many systems do not exhibit a binary condition with respect to reliability. That is, the system’s reliability wise condition is not fully describable with just two defined states: operational and non-operational. Rather, most complex systems exhibit intermediate and/or conditional reliability states. A basic example of an intermediate state is degraded performance; a state in which the system is not fully functional but does retain an acceptable level of performance to still be of some utility to the user. An example of a conditional reliability is any state less than fully operational that is acceptable under some condition and unacceptable under another condition.

The intent of this Master’s Project is for the student to apply the systems engineering concepts, principles and practices they have learned to:
1. A “real” system problem of interest to them, their sponsor and their assigned academic advisor;
2. Consider the SE concepts and techniques they have learned to propose a methodology for the treatment of these complex reliability states.
3. Develop of an associated SE paper fit for journal publication

Key Questions that could be considered for this Paper:
• What are examples where system failure severity leads to system states that can be characterized as intermediate (degraded) or conditional?
• How do traditional RM&S analyses (such as FMECA) treat or ignore conditional failure severity?
• How can SE concepts, techniques and tools be used to identify, document, model and analyze these systems?
• Consider at a minimum the use of requirements attributes, system modeling (including use cases and state machines), key parameter management, FMECA, fault trees, and probabilistic risk analysis.

References: 

• Cook, Jason L. (2006) Communications Reliability: Platform and Network. Proceedings of University of TN Maintenance and Reliability Conference (MARCON). Nashville, TN. May 2006.
• Cook, Jason L. (2007) Reliable Ad-hoc Networks for Future Combat Systems. Military Technologies Conference, Boston, MA. Mar 2007.
• Cook, Jason L. (2008) Multi-State Reliability Requirements for Complex Systems; Proceedings Annual Reliability and Maintainability Symposium; Las Vegas, NV. January 2008.
• Cook, Jason L. (2009) Multi-State Reliability Construct and Model for System of Systems (SoS); Proceedings Annual Reliability and Maintainability Symposium; Fort Worth, TX January 2009.
• Lisnianski, A., & Levitin, G. (2003). Multi-state system reliability: assessment, optimization and applications (No. 6). World scientific.
• Börger, E. (1999). High level system design and analysis using abstract state machines. In Applied Formal Methods—FM-Trends 98 (pp. 1-43). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
• Wright, David R. (2005). "Finite State Machines". CSC215 Class Notes. Prof. David R. Wright website, N. Carolina State Univ. Retrieved July 14, 2012.

Student Requirements: 

• The student should have a working knowledge of System RMS, Requirements Engineering, Systems Modeling, and Architectural Design. Completion of SYS625, SYS645 and SYS650, is recommended.

Send the faculty advisor an email to get additional information on this topic.
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