Sesha Alluri

LECTURER, CHEMISTRY
School: Schaefer School of Engineering & Science
Department: Chemistry and Chemical Biology
Building: McLean Hall
Room: 315
Phone: 201-216-3524
Fax: 201-216-8196
Email: salluri@stevens.edu
Research

Design and synthesis of biologically active novel heterocycles  and structure elucidation by 1D and 2D NMR analysis.

Many of the drugs in human medicine are chiral because they bind to enzymes and receptors to elicit biological activity. Both enzymes and receptors are chiral and therefore in a chiral drug molecule one of the enantiomer is more active than the other.
Most drugs are also heterocyclic in nature. Our research has focused on conceiving ideas of what heterocycles might show activity against a particular disease based on their bindings at enzyme or receptor level and to investigate the role of chirality in these molecules.
We have developed novel synthetic methodologies for stereoselective synthesis of these heterocycles possessing chiral centers and we believe these synthetic methodologies will be useful for the synthesis of other drugs.

Areas of specialty:  Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Synthesis, Structure-based drug design

Selected Publications
Journals
  1. (Jun 2016). "Novel Synthesis of Physovenine and Physostigmine Analogs", Tetrahedron Letters, (57), 3046-3049.
  2. (2014). "Structural Optimization of Cyclic Sulfonamide based Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Picomolar Affinities Guided by X-ray Crystallographic Analysis", Tetrahedron, 70 2894-2904.
  3. (2012). "Novel Synthesis and Functionalization of ortho-ortho Disubstituted Biphenyls and a Highly Condensed Novel Heterocycle using Radical Cyclization Reaction", Tetrahedron, 68 9750-9762.
  4. (2011). "Design, Synthesis and X-ray crystallographic analysis of a Novel Class of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors", Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 54 7176-7183.
  5. (2011). "A convenient enantioselective synthesis of 3-asymmetrically substituted oxindoles as progesterone receptor antagonists", Tetrahedron Letters, 52 3945-3948.
Books
  1. (2012). Stereoselective Synthesis of Biologically Active Novel Heterocycles in Drug Discovery , Lambert Academic.
Courses
  • CH 243 Organic Chemistry I
  • CH 244 Organic Chemistry II