Linux Installing Windows Applications

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Contents

Note

If possible, always install the Linux version of an application if you are using a Linux based operating system. Only use this method if there are no linux versions of an application available. The application that you would like to download must be a .exe file.

There are also multiple ways to run windows applications on linux. This is just one method, and it uses Wine.

This method doesn't work for all Windows application, but will work for many.

Requirements

You must be using a Linux based operating system. This tutorial is written for Ubunutu specifically, and will have to be changed slightly for other distributtions.

Install Wine

Start by installing Wine by opening the terminal and typing:

$ sudo apt-get install Wine

Go through the usual setup and installation of any normal Linux application.

Ubuntu users can also install Wine by opening the Software Center and typing in:

Wine

Install the Windows Application

After Wine is completely installed on your maching, installing Windows applications is simple. Simple start by downloading the desired .exe application. Then change directories so that you are in whichever directory the .exe application is stored in:

$ cd Directory_name

(replace Directory_name with the name of your own directory, ex: Downloads, Documents, etc.)

Then simply type Wine, followed by the name of the .exe file as such:

$ Wine Install_me.exe

(replace Install_me.exe with the name of the application that you are trying to install)

Now, simply follow the steps to install the application as you would in Windows.

Run the Windows Application

Many Windows applications have an install specific .exe file, and then create a new .exe file to run the actual installed application. Therefore you cannot expect the new installed application to run by typing the same command that you used to install.

The simplest solution to this is to select the "Create Shortcut" option during the initial installation of the application, so that you can access it simply by clicking the icon on your desktop.

A slightly more elaborate solution is to go to the folder where the files are kept within wine, and to open the file from there. All of your windows applications should be stored within your C Drive which is within your .wine directory, which should be accessible from your home directory.

In order to do that, go to your home directory and type:

$ cd ~/.wine/drive_c/Program\ Files

Or for x86 files, type:

$ cd ~/.wine/drive_c/Program\ Files\ \(x86\)

Then display the applications by typing this:

$ ls

Your applications should then display themselves. Then change the directory to the desired application name by typing:

$ cd Directory_name

(replace Directory_name with the name of the directory you are trying to get to)

Then view the .exe files by typing:

$ ls *.exe

This should display the .exe files for the application. Finally, simply type:

$ Wine Run_this_application.exe

(replace Run_this_application.exe with the name of the application that is in the folder, that you are trying to run)

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