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Mechanical Engineering

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Faculty
Soumitra Basu, Affiliate Assistant ProfessorRichard Berkof, Industry Professor & Director of Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Engineering Program
Dhanunjay Boyalakuntla, Affiliate Assistant ProfessorDavid Cappelleri,  Assistant Professor
Robert Chang, Assistant ProfessorConstantin Chassapis, Vice Provost for Academics
Chang-Hwan Choi, Assistant Professor Sven Esche, Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director
Frank Fisher, Interim Department Director of ME and Co-Director of the Nanotechnology Graduate ProgramHamid Hadim, Professor & Undergraduate Program Director
Yazan Manna, LecturerSouran Manoochehri, Professor
John Nastasi, Industry Professor & Director of Product-Architecture ProgramJan Nazalewicz, Industry Professor
Kishore Pochiraju, Associate Professor & Director of the Design and Manufacturing InstituteMarehalli Prasad, Professor
Elaine Pratt, Industry ProfessorYong Shi, Associate Professor
Leonid Shnayder, Industry Professor Siva Thangam, Professor & Dean of Academic Administration
Vi Van Trieu, Industry ProfessorAndrew Walsh, Industry Professor
Eui-Hyeok Yang, Associate Professor
Emeritus Faculty
Richard Cole, Professor EmeritusFernando Sisto, Professor Emeritus

Undergraduate Programs

The range and scope of mechanical engineering has undergone radical changes over the past decade, while retaining and expanding traditional areas of endeavor. Some of the changes have been due to the improvements in auxiliary fields, such as materials, or to the introduction of new fields, such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), information technology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering.

Traditionally, the design and production of machines have been major concerns of the mechanical engineer, working to the basic criteria of price, efficiency, and delivery date. Safety and environmental considerations have added new dimensions to the mechanical engineer's problem. This is most apparent in the design of new automobiles, where improved mileage and cleaner engines have been coupled with a reduction in weight and size, and greater emphasis on highway safety.

In all areas, increasing emphasis has been placed on synthesis, looking to the performance of complete systems as opposed to that of single components. Career opportunities are traditionally found in such diverse areas as power generation, design of machinery, manufacturing, research and development, guidance systems, product design and development, robotics, propulsion engineering, system analysis and design, and many others. Our graduates wishing to further their education have been successful in gaining admission to the schools of their choice.

Reflecting the wide diversity of subject matter to be found in the present-day practice of mechanical engineering, the department offers a multitude of opportunities for study and research. Major areas of interest include: energy conversion, design and manufacturing, HVAC, solid mechanics, automatic controls, dynamics, fluid mechanics, machine design, heat transfer, turbomachinery, combustion, robotics, and noise control. If you have particular interests or highly-specific objectives, we can generally satisfy your individual goals by elective courses and appropriate project work. Furthermore, The available pool of electives allows the student to specialize in one of the following concentration areas:

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Automation and Robotics
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Mechatronics
  • Pharmaceutical Manufacturing
  • Manufacturing
  • Product Design and Manufacture

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Mission and Objectives

The mission of the Mechanical Engineering Department is to produce graduates with a broad-based foundation in fundamental engineering principles and liberal arts, together with the depth of disciplinary knowledge needed to succeed in a career in mechanical engineering or a related field, including a wide variety of advanced technological and management careers.

To achieve its mission, the Department of Mechanical Engineering, with input from its constituents, has established the following Program Educational Objectives:

  • Graduates identify and solve problems in mechanical engineering and related fields using their broad-based knowledge of fundamental engineering concepts and state-of-the-art tools and techniques.

  • Graduates develop mechanical and thermal devices and systems to meet the needs of society.

  • Graduates excel in working within and leading multi-disciplinary teams.

  • Graduates conduct themselves in a socially responsible manner and adapt to technological change.

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Graduation Requirements

The following are requirements for graduation of all engineering students and are not included for academic credit. They will appear on the student record as pass/fail.

Physical Education (P.E.) Requirements

All students must complete a minimum of four semester credits of Physical Education (P.E.). A large number of activities are offered in lifetime, team, and wellness areas.

All PE courses must be completed by the end of the sixth semester. Students can enroll in more than the minimum required P.E. for graduation and are encouraged to do so.

Participation in varsity sports can be used to satisfy up to three credits of the P.E. requirement.

Participation in supervised, competitive club sports can be used to satisfy up to two credits of the P.E. requirement, with approval from the P.E. Coordinator.

English Language Proficiency     

All students must satisfy an English Language proficiency requirement.

PLEASE NOTE: A comprehensive Communications Program will be implemented for the Class of 2009. This may influence how the English Language Proficiency requirement is met. Details will be added when available.

Areas of Concentration

Mechanical engineering students can select their elective courses among two technical electives and three general electives in various ways. Some of them may wish to cluster those electives in ways that would help them gain expertise in an area of specialization within mechanical engineering. The following groupings are possible specialty (concentration) areas that students can select from within the mechanical engineering program: 

Aerospace Engineering

ME 545 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering

And two courses from the following:

ME 423 and ME 424 Senior Design Project
ME 453 Advanced Fluid Mechanics
ME 520 Analysis and Design of Composites
ME 546 Introduction to Turbomachinery

Automotive Engineering
ME 423 and ME 424 Senior Design Project
ME 515 Automotive Engineering
ME 529 Modern and Advanced Combustion Engines

Biomedical Engineering

Choose any three courses from the following:

BME 506 Biomechanics
ME 580 Medical Device Design and Technology
BME 306 Bio-Engineering
BME 342 Transport in Biological Systems
BME 482 Engineering Physiology

Mechatronics
ME 522 Mechatronics I
ME 523 Mechatronics II
ME 573 Introduction to Micro-Elecromechanical Systems

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

ME 530 Introduction to Pharmaceutical Manufacturing
ME 535 Good Manufacturing Practice in Pharmaceutical Facilities Design
ME 540 Validation and Regulatory Affairs in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

Power Generation
ME 510 Power Plant Engineering

And two courses from the following:

ME 513 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering
ME 529 Modern and Advanced Combustion Engines
ME 532 Air Pollution Principles and Control
ME 546 Introduction to Turbomachinery
ME 595 Heat Exchanger Design

Product Design and Manufacturing
ME 554 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design
ME 564 Principles of Optimum Design and Manufacture
ME 566 Design for Manufacturability

Product Engineering Architecture
PAE 610 The Creative form and the Digital Environment
PAE 630 Introduction to Interactive digital Media
PAE 640 Performative Environments

Robotics and Automation
ME 522 Mechatronics I
ME 551 Microprocessor Applications in Mechanical Engineeting
ME 598 Introduction to Robotics

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Minors

Students from other engineering programs may pursue a minor in Mechatronics by taking the required courses indicated below. Enrollment in a minor program means that you must also meet Stevens School of Engineering and Science requirements for minor programs. Only courses completed with a grade of "C" or better are accepted towards the minor.

Requirements for a Minor in Mechatronics:
ME 225 Dynamics
ME 358 Machine Dynamics Mechanics
ME 483 Control Systems
ME 509 Mechatronics I
ME 551 Microprocessor Applications in ME or ME 523 Mechatronics II or ME 573 Introduction to Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS)

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Graduate Programs

The Department of Mechanical Engineering provides three programs of graduate study leading to the degree of Master of Engineering: Mechanical, the professional Mechanical Engineer degree and the Doctor of Philosophy degree, with a concentration in mechanical engineering. A major objective of the graduate program is to encourage research work at all levels so that individuals can progressively undertake more challenging problems with a wider research scope as they gain confidence and competence.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering has active research interests in the following areas: composites and structured materials, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer, computer-aided design and manufacturing, integrated product and process design, control theory, design of thermal systems, industrial heat transfer, kinematics, knowledge-based engineering systems, machine design, metal forming, noise control and vibration, precision engineering, robotics and automation, system dynamics, nano/micro modeling, and micro/nanofabrication.

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Masterís Program

The Master of Engineering - Mechanical degree program is intended to extend and broaden the undergraduate preparation. It can be considered as a terminal degree or as preparation for the Ph.D. program. A bachelorís degree with a concentration in mechanical engineering is needed for acceptance to the masterís program. International students who did not earn a bachelorís degree from a US institution are required to take the TOEFL and GRE tests. Applicants with undergraduate degrees in other engineering disciplines may be required to take appropriate undergraduate courses before being formally admitted into the program.

The Master of Engineering - Mechanical degree requires 30 credits, approved by the studentís academic advisor. Fifteen of the credits (or five courses) form the core and comprise the studentís major field.

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Core Courses

ME 635 Simulation and Modeling
ME 641 Engineering Analysis I
ME 636 Project Management and Organizational Design

and two more courses from any one of the following four tracks:

Manufacturing Systems

ME 644 Computer-Integrated Design and Manufacturing
ME 645 Design of Production Systems
ME 652 Advanced Manufacturing
ME 665 Advanced Product Development

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Systems

ME 535 Good Manufacturing Practices in Pharmaceutical Facilities Design
ME 540 Validation and Regulatory Affairs in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing
ME 628 Pharmaceutical Finishing and Packaging Systems
ME 645 Production Systems

Product Design

ME 615 Thermal System Design
ME 644 Computer-Integrated Design and Manufacturing
ME 659 Advanced Structural Design
ME 665 Advanced Product Development

Thermal Engineering

ME 601 Engineering Thermodynamics
ME 604 Advanced Heat Transfer
ME 615 Thermal Systems Design
ME 674 Fluid Dynamics

The remaining five courses (15 credits) constitute the studentís elective field and will consist of:

at least one course of 600-level or higher given in the Mechanical Engineering Department;
a maximum of four courses of 500-level given in the Mechanical Engineering Department; and
a maximum of two courses given in other departments. 

A student may substitute a project (ME 800 Special Problems in Mechanical Engineering, 3 credits) or a thesis (ME 900 Thesis in Mechanical Engineering, 6 credits) for the appropriate number of credits. The available pool of electives allows the student to specialize in one of the following areas: Advanced Manufacturing, Air Pollution Technology, Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, Design and Production Management, Power Generation, Robotics and Control, Structural Analysis and Design, and Vibration and Noise Control.

In order to graduate with a Master of Engineering - Mechanical degree, a student must obtain a minimum of "B" average in the major field, as well as an overall average of "B" in all the courses needed to meet the 30-credit requirement for the degree. Please see the Office of Graduate Admissions section on Student Status.

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Doctoral Program

Admission to the doctoral program will be made through the Department Director in conjunction with the Graduate Committee, and will be based on an assessment of the applicant's academic background, competence, and aptitude for advanced study and research. An appropriate Master of Engineering degree or its equivalent is required. International students who did not earn a Master's degree from a US institution are required to take the TOEFL and GRE tests. If deemed acceptable, the student will be assigned an Advisor. Then, the student in conjunction with the Advisor will select a thesis topic and complete a study plan within three months in the program.

Courses are selected to develop skills in a particular area of interest. While this coursework is necessary to develop the tools and skills of the student's profession, the most important aspect of the doctoral program is the student's original research topic.

The subject of the doctoral dissertation (ME 960) is open to a wide range of particular choices. The selection of a topic by the doctoral aspirant provides for a sub-specialization within the broad range of mechanical engineering disciplines. The courses selected for the study plan should complement the student's dissertation subject.

Upon submission of an approved study plan by the student and no later than after one year of enrollment in the program, a Doctoral Committee is appointed for each student by the Department Director in conjunction with the Graduate Committee, with the Advisor as the chairperson. All doctoral students are required to take a qualifying examination (consisting of a Core Competency Test (CCT) and a Research Competency Test (RCT)) at the first offering after one year in the program. Upon failing the qualifying examination, the student may take the examination for a second time at the next offering. Upon failing the examination for the second time, the student will be asked to leave the program. In addition to the qualifying examination, all doctoral students are required to present a research proposal (including a written report and an oral presentation) to the Doctoral Committee for its approval. The candidate must present the proposal within 24 months of enrollment into the program. The Doctoral Committee, at its discretion, may decide on additional oral/written examinations before accepting the proposed dissertation plan. In the case where the committee rejects the research proposal, the candidate may submit a request for a second and final chance for presenting a revised research proposal during the following academic semester.

Upon satisfactory completion of theresearch proposal and all coursework, the student will be considered a doctoral candidate and continue the research which will form the basis of the student's dissertation. The dissertation must be based upon original investigation in the field of mechanical engineering, approved by the Department Director and Graduate Program Committee, and must be a contribution worthy of publication in the current professional literature. Before receiving the doctoral degree, the student must also satisfy the requirements for residence and publication of the dissertation.

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Nanotechnology Concentration

The Mechanical Engineering doctoral program is an integral part of the institute-wide Nanotechnology Graduate Program. A Ph.D. degree option in Mechanical Engineering with concentration on Nanotechnology is available to students who satisfy the conditions and requirements of the Nanotechnology area which are outlined in a separate section of the catalog.

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Ph.D Requirements

Applicants with a GPA of 3.5 or better in a Master's Program in Mechanical Engineering or a related field as well as with excellent TOEFL and GRE scores are encouraged to apply for the Ph.D. Program in Mechanical Engineering. Exceptionally well qualified applicants who obtained only a Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering or a related field will also be considered for direct admission into the Ph.D. Program in Mechanical Engineering. The Ph.D. Qualifying Examination consists of a Core Competency Test and a Research Competency Test to be taken after one year in the Ph.D. program.

The Ph.D. Program in Mechanical Engineering requires a total of 84 credits beyond the Bachelor's Degree in an approved program of study. Up to 30 credits previously obtained in a Master's Degree program in Mechanical Engineering or a related field may be applied towards this requirement. In addition, the Ph.D. program in Mechanical Engineering requires 30 credits of graduate course work and 30 credits of research work, culminating in a Ph.D. Dissertation based on the results of original research carried out under the guidance of a faculty member and defended in a public examination.

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Interdisciplinary Programs
Product-Architecture and Engineering Program

The Master of Engineering in Product-Architecture and Engineering degree program is intended to integrate the study of Product Design, Computational Architecture, and Engineering with production methodologies and emerging materials. All students in the program must complete 10 courses (30 credits), comprised of five core courses and up to five elective courses. Three of the five electives must be taken from the recommended list (see below) of relevant graduate courses offered by the Mechanical Engineering department. The remaining two courses (6 credits) constitute the student's elective field and will consist of at least one course of 600-level or higher offered within the Product-Architecture and Engineering program. Students may elect to complete a Thesis (PAE 900 Thesis in Product-Architecture and Engineering) in lieu of completing the two open electives.

A Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering, a B.I.D. (B.F.A., B.A., or B.S.) in Industrial Design, or a B.Arch. (Bachelor in Architecture) is needed for acceptance to the program. Applicants with undergraduate degrees in other engineering or design disciplines may be required to take appropriate undergraduate courses before being formally admitted into the program.

Core Courses

PAE 610 The Creative Form and the Digital Environment
PAE 620 The Creative Form and the Production Environment
PAE 630 Introduction to Interactive Digital Media
PAE 640 Performative Environments  
PAE 800 Product Architecture and Engineering Design Project

To complete the degree, requirements students can choose from the following list of courses:

ME 502 Introduction to Engineering Analysis
ME 520 Analysis and Design of Composites
ME 564 Principles of Optimum Design and Manufacture
ME 566 Design for Manufacturability
ME 635 Simulation and Modeling

In order to graduate with a Master of Engineering in Product-Architecture and Engineering, a student must obtain a minimum of "B" average in the major field, as well as an overall average of "B" in all the courses needed to meet the 30-credit requirement for the degree. Please see the Office of Graduate Admissions section on Student Status.

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Integrated Product Development

The Integrated Product Development degree is an integrated Master?s of Engineering degree program. The core courses emphasize the design, manufacture, implementation, and life-cycle issues of engineering systems. The remaining courses provide a disciplinary focus. The program embraces and balances qualitative, as well as quantitative, aspects and utilizes state-of-the-art tools and methodologies. It aims to educate students in problem-solving methodologies, modeling, analysis, simulation, and technical management. The program trains engineers in relevant software applications and in productive deployment and integration in the workplace.

All students in this program must complete ten courses (30 credits), comprised of four core courses and up to six elective courses selected from one of the four engineering tracks listed below. The student, with the approval of the graduate program director, may design customized tracks. Up to six elective credits may be taken in lieu of the course credits toward a project relevant to the selected track.

Core Courses - Integrated Product Development

IPD 601 Integrated Product Development I
IPD 602 Integrated Product Development II
IPD 611 Simulation and Modeling
IPD 612 Project Management and Organizational Design
(Full course descriptions can be found in the Interdisciplinary Programs section.)

Students then choose from one of the following four engineering tracks:

  • Armament Engineering
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Manufacturing Technologies
  • Systems Reliability and Design

The complete description of the IPD program can be found in the Interdisciplinary Programs section.

Armament Engineering Track

This technology track provides an interdisciplinary graduate education in Armament Engineering. The program emphasizes systems engineering of military weapons from concept through development and field use. Technical disciplines in the design and manufacture of explosives, modeling and simulation of the interior and exterior ballistics, rocket and missile design, guidance and control, modern research instrumentation, and testing procedures are emphasized.

ME 504 Interior Ballistics and Design for Projection
ME 505 Theory and Performance of Propellants and Explosives I
ME 506 Theory and Performance of Propellants and Explosives II
ME 507 Exterior Ballistics
ME 508 Terminal Ballistics
Plus one free elective.

Manufacturing Technologies Track

This track integrates product design, materials processing, and manufacturing expertise with modern computer software technology. The program is specifically concerned with product design for manufacturing, manufacturing systems analysis and development, robotics and control, and the integration of the various phases and activities associated with turning a concept into a deliverable product. Different manufacturing processes are introduced, and the design and control of these processes are discussed. Of particular interest are the development and implementation of models to predict the effects of design and manufacturing choices on system performance, producibility, and economics.

ME 560 Total Quality Control
ME 564 Principles of Optimal Design and Manufacture
ME 598 Introduction to Robotics
ME 621 Introduction to Modern Control Engineering
ME 644 Computer-Integrated Design and Manufacturing or 
ME 520 Analysis and Design of Composites
ME 645 Design of Production Systems

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Pharmaceutical Manufacturing (PME) Program

The Pharmaceutical Manufacturing (PME) masterís degree program is intended to integrate the study of pharmaceutical manufacturing concepts with more advanced engineering design and scientific methodologies to satisfy specialty needs within the industry. One of two degrees can be earned in this program, either a Master of Engineering degree or a Master of Science degree. The choice of degree is generally defined by the studentís background and the electives taken in the program:

a) A Master of Engineering degree can be earned if the student has a bachelorís degree in engineering and takes engineering electives,

b) A Master of Science Degree can be earned if the student has a bachelorís degree in science, engineering, technology, or another field and takes a mix of technical and/or management-type elective courses.

All students should take five foundation PME courses. Among the first courses taken should be PME 530, which is an introductory course and a pre-requisite for many PME electives. After that, other introductory courses including PME 540 and PME 609 (for the pharmaceutical industry) should be taken. Core required courses also include PME 535, and either PME 600 (for Master of Science) or PME 639 (for Master of Engineering). Thus, the five foundation courses for all masterís degree students are PME 530, 535, 540, 609, and 600 or 639.

Following the foundation courses, many electives are available to the students for the remaining five courses. As a general rule, a certain number of electives should be 600-level PME technical courses (e.g. PME 621, 628, 643, 646, 647, 649, 653). For Master of Engineering students, these should be at least three of the five electives; for Master of Science students, these should be at least two of the five. Other electives can be 500-level courses (e.g. PME 538, 539, 541, 542, 551, 560).

In addition to the Masterís degree-level offerings, the program currently offers five Graduate Certificates (GCs). One GC is more general and the others each address specialty areas within the process and equipment engineering aspects of pharmaceutical manufacturing. Each of the GCs currently available is described below, and has three required courses and a technical elective course:

Project Engineering in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing (PEPM)
Project engineers and project managers, and those aspiring to these positions in the pharmaceutical industry, will find that this GC provides more depth and understanding of these coordination efforts. In addition to the overall discipline view of facilities design, included are a formal introduction to project management concepts, specific implementation concepts for sterile facilities, and the newer PAT concepts.
Required courses: PME 535, PME 609, PME 643; Elective: PME 551.

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Graduate Certificate Programs

The Mechanical Engineering department offers several graduate certificate programs to students meeting the regular admission requirements for the master?s program. Each graduate certificate program is self-contained and highly focused, carrying 12 or more graduate credits. All of the courses may be used toward the Master of Engineering degree, as well as for the graduate certificate. Current graduate programs include:

Advanced Manufacturing

ME 566 Design for Manufacturability
ME 621 Introduction to Modern Control Engineering
ME 645 Design of Production Systems 
ME 652 Advanced Manufacturing

Air Pollution Technology

ME 532 Air Pollution Principles and Control
ME 590 Environmental Law for Practicing Engineers
ME 612 Selected Topics in Air Pollution Technology

Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer

ME 594 Computer Methods in Mechanical Engineering
ME 604 Advanced Heat Transfer or 
ME 609 Convective Heat Transfer
ME 674 Fluid Dynamics
ME 675 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer

Design and Production Management

ME 566 Design for Manufacturability
ME 636 Project Management and Organizational Design
ME 644 Computer-Integrated Design and Manufacturing
ME 645 Design of Production Systems

Ordnance Engineering

ME 505 Theory and Performance of Propellants and Explosives I
ME 507 Exterior Ballistics

and any two of the following three courses:

ME 504 Interior Ballistics and Design for Projection
ME 506 Theory of Performance of Propellants and Explosives II
ME 508 Terminal Ballistics

Power Generation

ME 510 Power Plant Engineering
ME 595 Heat Exchanger Design

and two of the following:

ME 529 Modern and Advanced Combustion Engines
ME 546 Introduction to Turbomachinery
ME 625 Gas Turbines

Product Architecture and Engineering

PAE 610 The Creative Form and the Digital Environment
PAE 620 The Creative Form and the Production Environment
PAE 630 Introduction to Interactive Digital Media
PAE 640 Performative Environments

Robotics and Control

ME 598 Introduction to Robotics
ME 621 Introduction to Modern Control Engineering
ME 622 Optimal Control and Estimation of Dynamical Systems or
ME 623 Design of Control Systems
ME 654 Advanced Robotics

Structural Analysis and Design

ME 658 Advanced Mechanics of Solids
ME 659 Advanced Structural Design
ME 661 Advanced Stress Analysis
ME 663 Finite-Element Methods

Vibration and Noise Control

ME 584 Vibration and Acoustics in Product Design
ME 611 Engineering Acoustics
ME 631 Mechanical Vibrations I
ME 651 Analytic Dynamics

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Mechanical Engineering Curriculum

Undergraduate Courses

Graduate Courses

On this page:

Undergraduate Programs

Graduate Programs

Master's Programs

Doctoral Program

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Engineering (PME) Program

Graduate Certificates

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